Thursday, 28 February 2019

Clyde Valley Stompers




The Clyde Valley Stompers were formed in 1952 in Glasgow, Scotland. The amateur trad jazz group quickly found a following at the Astra Ballroom in Glasgow and when band leader Jim McHarg (bass) emigrated to Canada two years later he was replaced by trombone player, Ian Menzies (1932 - 2001). Soon after the band became a full-time professional group. During the 50s, the moldy figs like Chris Barber, Humphrey Lyttleton, Acker Bilk and Kenny Ball became popular and the Clyde Valley Stompers extended their popularity beyond Scotland and released several records on the Beltona label.


(Video Courtesy: ptm51 by Youtube Channel)


Essentially they were a live act and the recordings never quite caught their energy subsequently their records did not sell especially well beyond their loyal following. The band members included, successively, Charlie Gall and Malcolm Higgins (trumpet), Jimmy Doherty, Forrie Cairns and Peter Kerr (clarinet). The rhythm section included pianists John Doherty, John Cairns and Ronnie Duff, banjo players Norrie Brown and Jim Douglas, bass players Louis Reddie, Andrew Bennie and Bill Bain, and drummers Bobby Shannon, Robbie Winter, Sandy Malcolm and Billy Law; and vocalists Mary McGowan, Jeannie Lamb and Fionna "Fiona" Duncan.


(Video Courtesy: krasner777 by Youtube Channel)


Dubbed ''the most travelled jazz band in Europe,'' they appeared in village halls and big venues alike and even topped the bill at Liverpool’s Cavern. As their popularity grew internationally the band moved to London, and signed for Pye Records.


(Video Courtesy: Pueni66 by Youtube Channel)


There they were managed by Lonnie Donegan and toured with him as well as other top names including Louis Armstrong, Shirley Bassey, Petula Clark and blues legend Big Bill Broonzy.


(Video Courtesy: KouKlouvahata Puppet Theatre by Youtube Channel)


Sometimes the band were billed at the Clyde Valley Stompers and others as Ian Menzies and the Clyde Valley Stompers.


(Video Courtesy: Ian Menzies & The Clyde Valley Stompers - Topic by Youtube Channel)


In 1962 they had a UK Top 30 success with ‘Peter And The Wolf.’


(Video Courtesy: kester1940 by Youtube Channel)


“Stompermania” predated the Mersey Sound but had all the same intensity. The Clyde Valley Stompers were the first trad jazz band to appear on the Royal Variety Performance, when it was held in Glasgow Empire. Their popularity in the UK was enhanced with guest appearances on television's Morecambe & Wise, Russ Conway, and Thank Your Lucky Stars shows. In 1963 the band appeared in a British musical called It's All Happening (The Dream Maker) and starring Tommy Steele..


(Video Courtesy: Jim Douglas by Youtube Channel)


As the fad for Trad Jazz passed the group disbanded in 1963. Over the decades the band has occasionally re-formed to perform as The Clyde Valley Stompers Reunion Band which included Jim McHarg.


(Video Courtesy: ptm51 by Youtube Channel)


Worth a listen
Lonnie Donegan Presents Ian Menzies and Clyde Valley Stompers
The Swingin' Seamus (EP) (1959)
Roses of Picardy/Beale Street Blues/
Gettysburg March/Swingin’ Seamus

Ian Menzies and Clyde Valley Stompers
Big Man (1961)
Play the gypsy (1961)
The fish man (1966)

Sunday, 20 January 2019

Sensational Alex Harvey Band (SAHB) Alex Harvey (1935 - 1982) Ted McKeena (1950 -2019 )



Alex Harvey was born in 1935 in the Gorbals, Glasgow. He did a number of jobs after leaving school aged 15, before turning to music in 1954. He played trumpet with a number of different Dixieland and jazz bands around Glasgow including the Clyde River Jazz Band and the Kansas City Skiffle Group. In 1956 he entered and won a talent competition as “Scotland’s answer to Tommy Steele.” Alex preferred the songs of Big Bill Broonzy and Jimmie Rogers and turned his talents to singing them in a skiffle group. Once skiffle peaked he played pop covers with the Kansas City Counts. In 1959, Alex had formed the "Alex Harvey's Soul Band," (sometimes called, Alex Harvey's Big Soul Band) and was performing around Scotland sometimes backing Gene Vincent, Eddie Cochran and John Lee Hooker on their local tours. The band took the opportunity to work in Germany eventually taking residency at the famous Top Ten Club in Hamburg. A recording contract with Polydor Records and released a live album called Alex Harvey and His Soul Band, in 1963.


(Video Courtesy: goneunderground77 by Youtube Channel)


The recording took place in an empty theatre with the Liverpool band the Undertakers (although some authorities credit "Kingsize" Taylor & the Dominos) both playing and acting as the audience. The album is now highly sought after and considered to be one of the better live recordings of that era. A couple of singles came from the album, an excellent cover version of Willie Dixons’ “I just want to make love to you”, which is in my opinion, superior to the Rolling Stones version; and a brilliant cover of Muddy Waters' "Got My Mojo Workin'".


(Video Courtesy: SOUTHERN REBEL by Youtube Channel)


Alex left the band in 1965 and recorded an album with his younger brother Les, the album was called The Blues.


(Video Courtesy: SOUTHERN REBEL by Youtube Channel)


Back in Glasgow a year later the Harvey brothers teamed with local musicians (including Bill Patrick and singer Isobel Bond) to form the Blues Council but the group soon disbanded and Alex briefly joined Giant Moth a psychedelic band.


(Video Courtesy: shingalingthing by Youtube Channel)


By 1967, he had found steadier work in the backup band for the London production of Hair. Three years later he released another solo effort, Roman Wall Blues, but it failed to make a commercial impact.


(Video Courtesy: MrDiogoRaul by Youtube Channel)


Just as Alex was rethinking his career he met Glasgow’s progressive rockers Tear Gas.


(Video Courtesy: MECA PD CHANNEL II by Youtube Channel)


Together they metamorphosed into the Sensational Alex Harvey Band in 1972. (SAHB) line up was guitarist Zal Cleminson ('Pierrot' image of white-painted clown make-up), bassist Chris Glen, and the cousins Ted and Hugh McKenna, on drums and keyboards respectively and Alex on vocals. The band gave a good sound and all were accomplished musicians who would be happy on stage performing old pop songs, Broadway standards, folk music and heavy rock. Their live act was amazing with Alex’s performances a combination of musical and verbal flair coached in both humour and sincerity with songs which often contained messages and morals.


(Video Courtesy: Harold de Mure by Youtube Channel)


The Sensational Alex Harvey Band scored a couple of chart hits in the UK "Delilah", a re-make of the Tom Jones hit, and also with "The Boston Tea Party".


(Video Courtesy: FOTOKINO by Youtube Channel)





(Video Courtesy: LZJoker by Youtube Channel)


In 1974 the band released the Next album.


(Video Courtesy: Anhalter Udo by Youtube Channel)


SAHB also made several concept albums including The Impossible Dream and Tomorrow Belongs To Me. Their live act also featured a tale of "Vambo", an urban superhero who was the subject of some of his more energetic numbers.


(Video Courtesy: The Silver Trembling Man by Youtube Channel)





(Video Courtesy: Diamonddog59 by Youtube Channel)


Alex's physical performances took its toll and with back problems the singer announced his retirement in 1977. He made a brief comeback in the '80s with the Electric Cowboys, but sadly died of a fatal heart attack in 1982. SAHB did reform after Alex’s death and played at rock concerts across Europe. After the break-up. Ted McKenna worked as a band member for several artists, including Rory Gallagher (1978–1981), and session musician with The Greg Lake Band (1980–81); the Michael Schenker Group (1981–84); Bugatti & Musker, (1982) among others. He formed his own band in the mid-80s before briefly touring with Ian Gillan in 1990, alongside fellow former SAHB member, Chris Glen. Two years later SAHB were reformed with Ted McKenna, Zal Cleminson, Hugh McKenna, and Stevie Doherty on vocals. The reformed SAHB made one album Live In Glasgow '93. Before disbanding in 1995. Ted became a lecturer in Applied Arts at North Glasgow College (1996–2011).


(Video Courtesy: mrjonthehat by Youtube Channel)


Between 2004 and 2009 they once again reformed the band with Max Maxwell on vocals. SAHB released the live album Zalvation. Zal Cleminson retired in 2008 and the band broke up soon after. Ted McKenna died in 2019.


(Video Courtesy: wunart by Youtube Channel)


Despite being consumate musicians, the reformed SAHB (in its various line-ups) would be in the absence of front man Alex, a pale shadow of its former self.



(Video Courtesy: tekhamburg by Youtube Channel)


Worth a listen:
Alex Harvey Soul Band
I just want to make love to you (1964)
I got my mojo working (1965)

Sensational Alex Harvey Band
Faith Healer (1973)
Gang Bang (1974)
Next (1974)
Vambo (1974)
Cheek to Cheek (1975)
Action Strasse (1975)
Delilah (1975)
Boston Tea Party (1976)

Thursday, 3 January 2019

Marmalade (aka Dean Ford and the Gaylords)



Glaswegians, William "Junior" Campbell met Patrick “Pat” Fairley both enjoyed playing rock roll and inspired by the Everly Brothers and Cliff Richard the Shadows, the boys formed a band in the early sixties. Junior Campbell (instrumentalist, vocalist), Pat Fairley (bass guitar), Billy Johnson (bass) and Tommy Frew (drums) became the Gaylords and played at local clubs. Later Bill Irving and Raymond Duffy, replaced Billy Johnson and Tommy Frew respectively and the quintet’s format was complete when Thomas McAleese (Dean Ford) joined them as the singer. Dean Ford and the Gaylords became one of Scotland’s most popular groups but like many others in the early 60s had little chance to get a recording contract. The group regularly supported visiting acts and were regulars on BBC Radio Scotland but real success failed them despite their undoubted popularity within Scotland. Eventually they were signed by EMI-Columbia in 1964. Their debut single "Twenty Miles," sold well in Scotland, but failed to chart nationally.


(Video Courtesy: Sids60sSounds by Youtube Channel)


The group relocated to London and fellow Glaswegian, Graham Knight replaced Bill Irwin. Despite more efforts to crack the charts their records failed and fame eluded them. Things changed when the Gaylord’s changed their management at the request of their friends, The Tremoloes manager Peter Walsh, recommended a change of name and The Gaylords now Marmalade became the resident band at the Marquee Club, London. In 1965, CBS Records signed Marmalade and their first single under the new label was "It's All Leading up to Saturday Night," but despite showing how the group had improved no commercial success came.


(Video Courtesy: GrauerOnkel by Youtube Channel)


The group persevered and their two bass players gave them a unique sound. Their next single "Can't Stop Now" (with Alan Whitehead as the group’s drummer) did well in the US, getting to number one on some State charts.


(Video Courtesy: hawkmoon03111951 by Youtube Channel)


Marmalade were a hard working band and getting more and more exposure as well as winning the admiration of fellow artists such as Jimi Hendrix. However chart success was not forthcoming and they were all but ready to give up when in 1968 they recorded "Lovin' Things." The single sold well and gave the group their first UK hit.


(Video Courtesy: Marmalade - Topic by Youtube Channel)


Their next single was a cover version The Beatle’s "Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da," from the White Album The song became number one hit in the UK and sold millions of copies around the world.


(Video Courtesy: KLEOPATRA1960s by Youtube Channel)


Marmalade was delighted with their success but a bit embarrassed because the sound was too commercial for their tastes, however, their record company was keen they continued in the same vein. Keen to lose the ‘bubblegum’ tag they changed labels and released “Reflections of My Life," an original composition by Campbell and Ford incorporating pop/rock and harder progressive elements. The single went to the top of the UK and US charts.


(Video Courtesy: jasmine e by Youtube Channel)


The follow up single "Rainbow," also sold well.


(Video Courtesy: dergoes by Youtube Channel)


By 1970, Marmalade was in serious internal strife and Junior Campbell left the band to pursue a successful solo career.


(Video Courtesy: Junior Campbell by Youtube Channel)


Hugh Nicholson (former Poets) joined Marmalade and shared the vocals. Junior Campbell continued to do the band’s arrangements and Marmalade’s music changed back to rock’n’roll. Alan Whitehead was eventually replaced by Dougie Henderson (Poets). By 1972, Pat Fairley decided to give up performing, and took over as the band's publicist and coordinating publishing activities. In the same year they were back in the charts with "Radancer.


(Video Courtesy: voxdeorum by Youtube Channel)


As the years passed new lineups followed until Dean Ford was the only original member. By this time Marmalade were more like Status Quo but as music tastes changed their popularity slipped. Peter Walsh grabbed the opportunity and used Alan Whitehead and Graham Knight as the basis for a relaunched Vintage Marmalade. Sandy Newman (vocals, guitar, keyboards) and Charlie Smith (guitar), made up the new format and they had a surprise hit with "Falling Apart at the Seams," in 1977. This was the group's last chart success. Marmalade continued with different formations to entertain live audiences.


(Video Courtesy: laserdisc70 by Youtube Channel)


Dean Ford continued as a solo performer and released a self-titled LP in 1975 then later, worked on a project with former Marmalade band member Hugh Nicholson. When his solo efforts failed to attract attention he moved to US in 1979. Now battling alcoholism, he dropped out of the music business. The royalties from "Reflections of My Life" keep him financially afloat, and in 1986 with the help of Alcoholics Anonymous, Ford was sober. Gradually he turned to music again by appearing in small clubs and open-mic venues. In 2002, he was back in the recording studio with a revamped The Sensational Alex Harvey Band (SAHB) and they recorded a version of Dancing In The Rain for a Tribute to Frankie Miller album. He continued touring with The Sensational Alex Harvey Band, then later in 2012, Dean worked with Joe Tansin (Badfinger) and recorded a notable latter day version of "Reflections of My Life". Dean Ford passed away aged 73 in 2018.


(Video Courtesy: ShalimarJan by Youtube Channel)





(Video Courtesy: joe tansin by Youtube Channel)


Worth a listen:
Lovin' Things (1968)
Wait For Me Mary-Anne (1968)
Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da (1968)
Reflections Of My Life (1969)
Rainbow (1970)
Cousin Norman (1971)
Radancer (1972)
Falling Apart At The Seams (1976)

Thursday, 29 November 2018

Iain (Stewart) Macmillan (1938 – 2006)




Iain Stewart Macmillan was born in 1938 in Dundee, Scotland. He attended the Dundee High School, graduated in 1954 before taking his first job as a trainee manager at a jute mill. In 1958 Ian moved to London to study photography at the Regent Street Polytechnic (now the University of Westminster). His first work was as a cruise photographer but he also went home to photograph street scenes, and tenement of old Dundee.



His moving portrayal of the disappearing sights of a city in regeneration are memorable and in the same spirit as Oscar Marzarolli’s Shades of Grey Glasgow 1956 -1987. Macmillan captured boys playing football in the back streets to a “scramble” (or scrammie) at a local church wedding where children scrabble for thrown coins.



He graduated in the early 1960s and his talent was soon recognised by magazines and publishers including the Sunday Times, the Illustrated London News, Tatler and Harpers & Queen. This brought the quiet Scotsman into the world of London’s Swinging 60s.



He took photographs for a book, The sculpture of David Wynne 1949-1967, and for Wynne's exhibition catalogue.



In 1966, The Book of London was published and Macmillan had been commissioned to take a series of photographs of life in the city. The photographer was introduced to Yoko Ono and photographed the avant-garde artist presenting a demonstration of "Handkerchief Piece". The photo shows Yoko and three others wearing handkerchiefs tied over their mouths. Yoko was sufficiently impressed by his work, she invited him to photograph her new exhibition at the Indica gallery, in St James’s. It was there that Yoko met John Lennon.



As his reputation grew the photographer was commissioned by many of the leading newspapers and magazines such as Tatler, the Sunday Times, Harpers & Queen to take portraits of celebrities from the worlds of sport, art, politics, acting and pop music. Examples include Pete Townshend of The Who, Brian Jones of The Rolling Stones, Stevie Wonder, Twiggy, Floyd Paterson, Bridget Riley, Maggie Smith and Donald Sutherland to name but a few. Some of these photographs were used to illustrate the 1967 book ‘The Young Meteors: An Inside Report on the Rising Stars of London in Fashion, Entertainment, Modeling, Art, Politics, Journalism’ by Jonathan Aitken. In 1970, he took the cover photograph of Kenny Rogers and The First Edition’s album Something’s burning.



In 1969 John Lennon invited Macmillan to be the photographer for the cover of the new album, Abbey Road. The Beatles decided to name their last album after the road where Abbey Road recording studio stood.



On 8th August 1969, around 11:30am, Iain Macmillan climbed a stepladder about 10 feet in the air in the middle of Abbey Road and took six pictures of the Beatles walking on a zebra crossing near the EMI Studios. Police were hired to control the traffic and any stray fans. In total the photoshoot took ten minutes and produced arguably the most iconic photograph of the Fab Four.



In the first photograph John leads the group from left to right followed by Ringo, Paul and George. They kept this order throughout all the photos. There is a Mercedes pulling out of the studio behind them. John is looking away from the camera and Paul and George are in mid step. Paul is wearing sandals. Inthw second photograph they walk back in the same order. Good spacing but only John has a full step. The third shot captures them left to right again, full steps but they are all too far left. The traffic is beginning to build up with a taxi, two vans and a double decker bus waiting to come forward. Paul is now barefoot. In the fourth shot they are walking right to left again with Paul Ringo and George all in mid step. The traffic has gone through but the bus has stopped to watch. The fifth shot became the cover of the album and is the only photo where Paul smoking and with their legs in perfect formation. In the sixth photograph Ringo is slightly too far behind John and the bus has turned around to leave.



After the Beatles broke up Iain continued to work for John and Yoko on several projects. Macmillan took the picture of the wedding cake which featured on John and Yoko's Wedding Album (1969). He also designed the cover for Give Peace a Chance.



He later photographed the clouds on Live Peace In Toronto (1969), by John and Yoko.



Yoko asked Iain to morph the faces of John and herself for the back cover of a cover of the exhibition catalogue for her career retrospective, This Is Not Here, in 1971. Apple Records used the same images on the 7"transparent green vinyl pressing of "Happy Xmas (War Is Over)" and "Listen, the Snow Is Falling" released in December 1971.



The same sequence of five images showing Lennon's face transforming into Ono's was used on the pressing of the album Sometime in New York City (1972). Macmillan was also involved in taking pictures for the cover, after living with them for a month the previous September.


(Video Courtesy: Music Ever by Youtube Channel)


Iain also collaborated on the film Erection, an animation of shots of a London hotel under construction with a soundtrack by John and Yoko.


(Video Courtesy: MrDominus75 by Youtube Channel)


In New York, he photographed much of Yoko’s avant-garde work, including the promotional film for her second album, Flies (1971). It proved a technical nightmare.


(Video Courtesy: xprmntlmkp by Youtube Channel)


He also took the cover photo on Yoko's later editions of Grapefruit.



By the mid - 70s, Macmillan had returned to England and was teaching part-time photography at a college in Stoke-on-Trent. Then in 1980, Iain took the cover photo for the album Hinge and Bracket at Abbey Road which was a parody of the Beatles photo.



An exhibition of his works toured the US, Britain and Europe and the BBC used some of his photos in the series The Rock 'n' Roll Years. He moved back to Carnoustie, after his parents died in the 80s and with his beloved collie dog, Mac by his side took photographs of Scottish landscapes, his friends and families.


(Video Courtesy: only1eebo by Youtube Channel)


In 1993, Paul McCartney invited Macmillan to take another picture on the famous zebra crossing near the EMI studios in St John’s Wood for the album cover of Paul is Live. This time McCartney had for company an Old English sheepdog. Macmillan contrasted the simplicity of the earlier picture by including a team of policemen, press photographers and a lively crowd.



Iain sadly died in 2006 from lung cancer. Macmillan was always modest about his own achievements and retained a lasting affection for Paul and Linda McCartney.

Further reading
Abbey Road Crossing Cam Live Feed
From Dundee to Abbey Road
Paul is Dead

Wednesday, 28 November 2018

John 'Patrick' Byrne : Album artwork





John Byrne was born in 1940 in Paisley. He grew up in Ferguslie Park housing scheme and went to St Mirin's Academy. After he left school his first job was mixing powdercolour for the designers at A F Stoddard, carpet manufacturers, in Elderslie. The slab boy left after a couple of years to study at the Glasgow Art School specialising in drawing & painting. In his final year he won the Bellahousten Award for painting and travelled to Italy for six months. Despite his undoubted talent John found breaking into the art world difficult and decided to send a small picture of a man in a panama hat in the faux-naïf style (affectedly naïve) to the Portal Gallery in Mayfair. A perpetual joker he claimed this was the work of Patrick, his father, an untrained painter. To Byrne’s surprise the gallery asked to see more of 'Patrick's' work. He sat down and painted another half-dozen in the 'naive' style and the result, was a one-man show at the Portal Gallery, London in 1967.







A year later Byrne was commission to paint the cover for the Beatles new album entitled Dolls House. For inspiration he took the artwork from Alan Aldridge’s book The Beatles Illustrated Lyrics. The album was retitled Double White and issued with the famous all white cover. Byrne’s artwork was later used on the Ballads compilation released in 1980. The Beatles: "De Mooiste Songs" (The most beautiful songs) was also released on Dutch Parlophone in the same year with a similar cover.







The Humblebums was a Glasgow based folk duo of Billy Connolly and Tam Harvey. Later Gerry Rafferty joined them to make a trio but Harvey left soon after. Gerry was a fellow Paisley Buddy and good friend of John Byrne who he asked to produce artwork for the cover for their new album, The New Humblebums in 1969. Gerry and Billy included a track written by Rafferty entitled Patrick on the album dedicated to Patrick. The lyrics begin.

"Patrick my primitive painter of art/You will always and ever be near to my heart")




(Video Courtesy: SittingDownWith by Youtube Channel)


This would cement the beginning of a long working relationship between Byrne and Rafferty who later completed several of the singer’s solo albums covers and together they co-wrote several songs.











In 1971 the artist was also commissioned to paint an album cover for Donovan entitled HMS Donovan. He also animated a cartoon movie called Old Fashioned Picture Book, inspired by HMS Donovan and including three songs from the album. The movie was scripted by Alan Bennett but only a short length pilot was ever made and the full film never was finished.


(Video Courtesy: Magicgeorgeify by Youtube Channel)








When Gerry Rafferty left the Humblebums to pursue a solo career he released his debut album, Can I have my money back” with sleeve artwork designed by John Byrne. John also helped co-write the track "One Drink Down" with Gerry Rafferty which features on the album.


(Video Courtesy: budcritchlow by Youtube Channel)






John Byrne was commissioned to do the artwork for Billy Connolly’s first solo album in 1972, entitled Billy Connolly Live! The singer,comedian had then only a small cult audience in Glasgow.





In the same year Gerry Rafferty teamed up with school friend Joe Egan to form Stealers Wheel with Roger Brown, Rab Noakes and Ian Campbell. They signed for A&M Records and before they started to record their first album Brown, Noakes and Campbell were replaced by Paul Pilnick, Tony Williams and Rod Coombes respectively. The cover for the new album was a John Byrne original. Closer examination reveal the name 'Stealers Wheel' carefully embedded eight times in the design, in addition to the large lettering in the bottom left-hand corner. The album was a critical and commercial success with the hit single "Stuck in the Middle with You", on the album. By the time the first album was released Rafferty had left the band to be replaced by Luther Grosvenor.


(Video Courtesy: Elconquistador69too by Youtube Channel)








Gerry was persuaded to return to Stealer’s Wheel and continued with Joe Eagan as a duo with backing musicians as needed on tour and in the studio. The second album Ferguslie Park was released in 1974 and once again the artwork was by John Byrne .


(Video Courtesy: DescentOfMadness by Youtube Channel)










The band released their final album Right or Wrong (1975) which prominently featured sleeve designs by John Byrne. It also included an inner sleeve.






(Video Courtesy: lozkopij by Youtube Channel)










The collaboration between artist and singer continued and when Rafferty released his City to City solo album in 1979 it had a portrait of himself, painted by John Byrne on the cover. The album included Baker Street which featured the distinctive saxophone solo played by Raphael Ravenscroft. The success of Baker Street and other tracks as singles established Gerry Rafferty as an International success. The exposure further enhanced John Byrne’s bludgeoning career as artist, and playwright. When the single was released it had a sleeve (cover) with Byrne's artwork.






(Video Courtesy: dkrisek by Youtube Channel)










The Night Owl album was also released in 1979 and again had the sleeve emblazoned with a John Byrne original. By now Rafferty’s albums were instantly recognised by the distinctive artwork of his friend, John Byrne.


(Video Courtesy: Gerry Rafferty by Youtube Channel)










The last Gerry Rafferty album to feature the artworks of John Byrne before there was a reprise came in the 1980 release of Snakes and Ladders. The album was less commercially successful than the previous releases and Rafferty was beginning to musically change his direction. His next release was the introverted Sleepwalking (1982) which instead of a cover painting and hand-lettering by John 'Patrick' Byrne, featured a simple, stark photograph of an empty road stretching to the sky. The single from the album Royal Mile was released in a sleeve by John Byrne artwork.










(Video Courtesy: ulladubullab by Youtube Channel)










It was Another World, the ninth and final studio album by Gerry Rafferty that again featured the artwork of John Byrne. The front cover is entitled Dark Victory and rear booklet back cover Pensive Angel. The album was released in 2000 on the Icon Music label to good reviews. The single All Souls was released in a sleeve designed by John Byrne.











Byrne's artwork featured on the compilation albums One More Dream: The Very Best of Gerry Rafferty which was released in 1995: the Days Gone Down: The Anthology: 1970–1982 (2006): and Gerry Rafferty & Stealers Wheel: Collected (2011). This would come as no real surprise as by this time Byrne and Rafferty's collaboration was inseparable.











To commemorate the works of Gerry Rafferty, Barbara Dickson, his friend and admirer, recorded some of his songs in 2013. The front cover was painted by John Byrne.